(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

in c-nroument Kates, in Hypotnetical
Total Enrollments				
	High Fertility Projection	Rapidly Declining Fertility Projection	Difference	Savings (3) as a Percent of(l)
	(1)	(2)	(3)	(4)
After 10 years:				
Constant ER ER rising to 95 percent after 40 years ER rising to 95 percent after 30 years ER rising to 95 percent after 20 years ER rising to 95 percent after 10 years	68,734 85,334 91,709 105,920 163,244	66,768 82,892 89,085 102,889 158,573	1,966 2,442 2,624 3,031 4,671	2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.9
After 20 years:				
Constant ER ER rising to 95 percent after 40 years ER rising to 95 percent after 30 years ER rising to 95 percent after 20 years	97,730 150,602 173,959 232,109	68,251 105,174 121,486 162,096	29,479 45,428 52,473 70,013	30.2 30.2 30.2 30.2
After 30 years:				
Constant ER ER rising to 95 percent after 40 years ER rising to 95 percent after 30 years	137,838 263,719 327,365	67,081 128,342 159,317	70,757 135,377 168,048	51.3 51.3 51.3
Source:  Author's calculations. advantage of reduced fertility. The relative saving in enrollments caused in any given time period by the decline in fertility can be altered only by altering the speed of that decline. The absolute saving in enrollments is, of course, larger the more rapidly enrollment rates are raised.